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Career and Technical Education (CATE) - Manufacturing

A career in manufacturing is usually not the first thing that comes to mind for students when asked about their ambition. What they fail to learn is how lucrative the world of manufacturing is in that it is the main drivers of GDP in the US and Canada. Yes, manufacturing work can be found in a variety of companies including General Motors, Hitachi, and Royal Canadian Mint.

Manufacturers convert raw materials into completed products. They create new things out of putting components together. It truly is a very innovative-driven career path that is best fit for trailblazers or people who like to play around with ground-breaking ideas.

The largest industries in manufacturing are transportation, food, and petroleum. Students can explore careers here by being manufacturing quality specialists or general mechanics. There’s also work as production managers in the exciting world of assembly production.

The good news is that most of the baseline manufacturing positions are lenient on their requirements. Of course, this does not mean that students won’t explore college with technical program studies. As in many careers, while vocational students can still land jobs, those with degrees still arrive at higher paid positions. Industrial managers, for example require applicants to possess a degree in business administration, industrial engineering and possibly five years of work experience.