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Language Arts - Study Skills

Having the diligence to study starts with being taught to do so during the fundamental time of a child’s life. It’s something that students need to both learn from parents and teachers, and also develop for themselves. A study culture is something created individually. Getting that drive to retain information from school and practice such information at home requires a desire to learn.

Students who gain examples from adults on proper study habits are lucky. Others who are quite late in the diligence game will have to learn from the 3 study skills below.

Learn the two important study skill terms, review and study. “Review” means to have a look at the lessons again, while “study” means to think about the lesson until students fully grasp everything about it and can even explain in their own words.

Studying is a daily process. Students need to do the first tip which is to plan their daily work. They can divide lessons into days or hours of a day. If they are studying after school hours, they can review lessons at a 30-minute interval depending on the difficulty level. Putting equal times for each subject allows students to hasten during difficult parts and rest when they can easily finish easy parts.

Studying alone is the second tip. Learners need to be in the zone. Sure, the dining table at home is a tempting place to open gadgets, but it’s no place to open a book. Aside from expected noises all around, learners will get distracted by what others are doing, ending up leaving study time for unproductive activities. Staying in the room or getting headphones while sitting in a corner is a necessary decision.

Memorize the work as you go. This is a sort of skill that will allow students to review efficiently and not hard. It’s basically saying that they should understand whatever they are reading enough to memorize the thought. Improvements will show if they are able to tell another person about the details of the lessons they went through using their own words.