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Home Economics

Home economics is something that not too many kids today are familiar with. In many schools, in fact, it is no longer taught. The subject is usually put aside in favor of more "academic" subjects like those under the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. While there is nothing inherently wrong with encouraging young ones to be scientists, there would be something missing if too much emphasis is put on STEM.

As a result of this, schools tend to produce students that are ill-equipped for the other aspects of life in the real world. These are things like cooking, cleaning, and budgeting. Many young people are thrust into the real world all of a sudden with no idea how to navigate these parts of life on their own. Because of that, young people often struggle to live independently.

This is where Home Economics comes in. It teaches students basic home skills, as the name suggests. This subject is a good idea since it can augment what the parents teach at home. For some, it may be their first exposure to such a skill set, especially if the parents are too busy to do housework, let alone teach their kids to do housework.

According to the education website SeattlePi, there are seven key parts of home economics: Cooking, Child Development, Education and Community Awareness, Home Management and Design, Sewing and Textiles, Budgeting, and Health and Hygiene. In the past, these were tasks typically done by women, but today even men would benefit from having these skills. This is especially true for males who want to live on their own.

For both boys and girls, independent living requires the know-how to manage their homes by themselves. And what better way to learn than through home economics? With these skills in hand, young adults would be better equipped to live life on their own.